Thursday, March 29, 2012

What Strong Women Look Like

A minor controversy has erupted over Katy Perry's latest video. Well it only erupted because some useless D list "feminist" who hasn't written anything of worth in decades, decided to deride her for using women marines as a symbol of strength. For those who don't know who Naomi Wolf is, she wrote the first look at the culture of "beauty." It was interesting when it was written. Since then however, she sounds like a whinny caricature of real activist women.

Women like the amazing Ayaan Hirsi Ali and all those who risk their lives to end honor killings, forced marriage, gender apartheid and female genital mutilation are the true feminists of our generation. These atrocities, by the way, most self-proclaimed American "feminists" don't condemn because they prefer to adhere to the idea of cultural relativism rather than stand up for their abused sisters.  Here Here Wolf also thinks that the burqa, that feed bag that Moslem women have to wear in countries like Saudi Arabia is sexy, her words not mine. Here

The absolute irony here is that if it weren't for these marines defending freedom and our way of life, Naomi Wolf couldn't say the stupid, ignorant, insulting and pompous things she does. Her latest venture was being arrested with the Occupy Wall Street crowd. Of course once she was released she did return to her million dollar apartment. Nothing like being a 1-percenter and telling everybody else how to live I suppose. Can you tell I think she is an embarrassment to the women's rights movement?

Here's the comment I left at the Huffington Post:

Wolfe is an irrelevant dilettante and an embarrassment to real women's rights activists. 

Here's the Katy Perry video:

 

By the way, you can have any opinion of Wolf that you want. Free country and all. But quite frankly I think the present women's rights movement in this country in total, is an embarrassment to our forebearers. 

If you are interested in real feminist writings read Dr. Phyllis Chesler. Her life alone reads like an adventure novel. As a young Jewish woman, she married a Moslem man. Moved to his country. Was promptly imprisoned by him. Luckily she managed to escape. She returned home and began a personal crusade for women's equality and rights.


Until next time,


Elise